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I'm a partner at Greylock, former CEO of Mozilla, founder of Reactivity, dad, husband & nerd, among other things.

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    Mobile, Scale & Winner-take-most Thinking

    Great tweet by @benedictEvans, as usual:

    @BenedictEvans: We have no precedent to understand ecosystem scale effects when the smaller ecosystem has 6/700m users, and at least half of the activity

    This is exactly right, and I think an overwhelming theme of the times. People say “it’s playing out exactly like Mac v PC” or “it’s nothing like that”.

    The truth is, like a lot of things, it’s different, but the same. It’s the same in the sense that an OS paired with a ton of different manufacturers around the world and an openish software layer has become dominant in global market share, and that the lower volume player (Apple) is perceived widely as the superior user experience. (IMHO with significant merit.)

    It’s different in the sense that in the US, where many important developers live and work, it’s close to 50/50. More importantly, it’s different in that the minority ecosystem of IOS has hundreds of millions of users, and they’re all spending money.

    We’re used to thinking about tech as winner takes all because the minority players are all sub scale.

    With billions of users in the market, it is not clear at all that winner-takes-all or even winner-takes-most will be true at all.

    It seems pretty clear to me that at this point Apple has conclusively proved that the traditional thinking no longer applies.

    SPL’s new kicks. He tells me my shoes range from “not great” to “incredibly ugly.”

    SPL’s new kicks. He tells me my shoes range from “not great” to “incredibly ugly.”

    Microsoft & Minecraft

    Sometimes 140 characters isn’t quite enough to have a nuanced back & forth.

    A few minutes ago I tweeted that the more I think about it, the more I think that Microsoft buying Minecraft is an incredible, incredible (and surprising) move by Satya Nadella that is very very long range in thinking. 

    I got some pushback in my Twitter stream that says Microsoft doesn’t need another game franchise, has a strong Xbox line, etc etc. 

    But here’s the thing: Minecraft is less like Halo, and a lot more like Lego. It’s not a game, any more than Lego is just a toy. It’s cultural, and foundational. 

    When I talk with just about any techie maker that I know today, then can remember back to when they first started playing around with how things work, with how to make their own new things. People in my generation can remember, vividly, when they started playing D&D and how they built those worlds. How they set up their little Lego guys in all sorts of scenarios. And what computer they typed (copied, generally) their first program into. The generation after mine remembers that, but built on the web & Netscape. The newest generation can tell you about their first mobile app building experience.

    So here’s the thing: the next generation of makers — 5 or 10 years down the road — they’re all building worlds in Minecraft today. Just look around. Watch what the most interesting kids around are getting obsessed about. Take a look at what they’re building, and the levels of complexity they’re grappling with before they even really can grok what they’re making.

    They’re next. 

    And Microsoft buying Minecraft — and, hopefully, investing in Minecraft in a way that also lets it stay independent and vibrant — says, very clearly, that Microsoft wants to stand, again, with the makers. 

    Lots of reasons to be skeptical, cynical, pessimistic, or whatever. And anyone who knows me or my background knows that I’ve been very skeptical of, if not combative with, Microsoft through most of my career.

    But with this move, Microsoft is saying they are with the makers — the next generation — and that’s a smart, wondrous, and optimistic start to Satya’s leadership there, seems to me. 

    Truthfully, this might be the absolute ideal way to watch LSJUMB. #hyperlapse #gostanford (I kid! I kid!)

    Game day. #hyperlapse #gostanford

    First AYSO day for Z.

    First AYSO day for Z.

    whitehouse:

Betsey Stevenson just signed off as today’s Chartist in Residence for I Love Charts. Be sure to check out all of her posts on the gender pay gap and how we fix it. Thanks for following along!
ilovecharts:

Here’s the bottom line: We’re making progress, but the gender pay gap still exists at all income levels, and widens as people get older.
Highly-educated women with professional degrees tend to begin their careers at approximately the same salary level as their male counterparts, but as their careers progress, a gender gap opens up. By their late 30’s, men with professional degrees earn 50% more than their female counterparts.
So how do we fix that? Beginning with the first bill he signed into law, President Obama’s been fighting to help women receive the pay they deserve. But he can’t do it all by himself. Congress needs to act to help ensure equal pay for women.
That’s all for today! I hope you enjoyed our charts. I had a blast. —Betsey

    whitehouse:

    Betsey Stevenson just signed off as today’s Chartist in Residence for I Love Charts. Be sure to check out all of her posts on the gender pay gap and how we fix it. Thanks for following along!

    ilovecharts:

    Here’s the bottom line: We’re making progress, but the gender pay gap still exists at all income levels, and widens as people get older.

    Highly-educated women with professional degrees tend to begin their careers at approximately the same salary level as their male counterparts, but as their careers progress, a gender gap opens up. By their late 30’s, men with professional degrees earn 50% more than their female counterparts.

    So how do we fix that? Beginning with the first bill he signed into law, President Obama’s been fighting to help women receive the pay they deserve. But he can’t do it all by himself. Congress needs to act to help ensure equal pay for women.

    That’s all for today! I hope you enjoyed our charts. I had a blast. —Betsey

    whitehouse:

Did you think she was done for the day? Here’s Betsey Stevenson on America’s place among developed nations in female labor force participation, and how we can improve it.
ilovecharts:

Ok, so things are improving on many fronts when it comes to women in the workforce, but we’re slipping compared to other countries when it comes to female labor force participation.
Since 1990, the U.S. has dropped from 7th to 16th in that category among advanced democracies—that’s in the bottom third. In fact, we’re the only developed country that does not guarantee paid maternity leave.
But with the right policy changes, we can jump back up the leaderboard and help expand opportunity for millions of women. Paid leave and other policies that enable workers to better balance work and family obligations could help boost female labor force participation. One study estimated that U.S. female labor force participation would be 6.8 percentage points higher if the U.S. had implemented a suite of family-friendly policies. (cc Republicans in Congress)

    whitehouse:

    Did you think she was done for the day? Here’s Betsey Stevenson on America’s place among developed nations in female labor force participation, and how we can improve it.

    ilovecharts:

    Ok, so things are improving on many fronts when it comes to women in the workforce, but we’re slipping compared to other countries when it comes to female labor force participation.

    Since 1990, the U.S. has dropped from 7th to 16th in that category among advanced democracies—that’s in the bottom third. In fact, we’re the only developed country that does not guarantee paid maternity leave.

    But with the right policy changes, we can jump back up the leaderboard and help expand opportunity for millions of women. Paid leave and other policies that enable workers to better balance work and family obligations could help boost female labor force participation. One study estimated that U.S. female labor force participation would be 6.8 percentage points higher if the U.S. had implemented a suite of family-friendly policies. (cc Republicans in Congress)

    whitehouse:

    More from Betsey Stevenson on I Love Charts: Read her take on the wage gap between men and women, and how it’s changed since the 1970s.

    ilovecharts:

    Ok, let’s get back to wages.

    The earnings gap between men and women still exists today, but since the 1970’s:

    1. Women’s hourly earnings have grown more quickly than men’s, following a similar trend to GDP growth.
    2. Growth in median family income has largely come from increases in women’s earnings, rather than from men’s earnings.
    3. Earnings for both married and single mothers increased by about 33%.
    4. Married mothers’ contributions to total family income increased from less than one-third to about 40%.

    In other words, women are bringing home more of the bacon, but we still have more work to do to ensure equal pay for equal work.

    staff:

ilovecharts:

Hey everyone! Betsey Stevenson here from President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers. In honor of Women’s Equality Day, I’ll be taking over I Love Charts to tell the story of the progress we’ve made in closing the earnings gap between women and men, and the challenges women still face in the workforce. 

Betsey says it better than we can. Have a look at the results. 
Also, hey, Happy Women’s Equality Day, Tumblr. 

    staff:

    ilovecharts:

    Hey everyone! Betsey Stevenson here from President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers. In honor of Women’s Equality Day, I’ll be taking over I Love Charts to tell the story of the progress we’ve made in closing the earnings gap between women and men, and the challenges women still face in the workforce. 

    Betsey says it better than we can. Have a look at the results

    Also, hey, Happy Women’s Equality Day, Tumblr. 

    whitehouse:

Betsey Stevenson’s takeover of I Love Charts continues: Check out how women are cracking the glass ceiling in fields traditionally dominated by men.
ilovecharts:

Women have been doing some serious glass-ceiling cracking since the 1960’s. Young women are increasingly working in fields traditionally dominated by men.
Today, female college graduates ages 30 to 34 are just as likely to be employed as doctors, dentists, lawyers, professors, managers and scientists as they are to be employed as teachers, nurses, librarians, secretaries or social workers.
This is a big deal, and reflects the closing of a substantial gap. Women in the 1960’s were 7 times more likely to work in traditionally female occupations. Studies estimate that 15% to 20% of wage growth in the last 50 years was due to a decline in barriers to occupational choice.
So we’ve made a lot of progress, but clearly there’s more work to be done to get more women into predominately male-dominated fields and more men into female-dominated fields. For example, less than 20% of graduates in computer science and engineering are women, down from 37% in 1985. Reducing barriers to female occupational choice, including gender discrimination, would not only raise women’s earnings, but would also increase overall productivity by better matching workers’ skills to jobs.

    whitehouse:

    Betsey Stevenson’s takeover of I Love Charts continues: Check out how women are cracking the glass ceiling in fields traditionally dominated by men.

    ilovecharts:

    Women have been doing some serious glass-ceiling cracking since the 1960’s. Young women are increasingly working in fields traditionally dominated by men.

    Today, female college graduates ages 30 to 34 are just as likely to be employed as doctors, dentists, lawyers, professors, managers and scientists as they are to be employed as teachers, nurses, librarians, secretaries or social workers.

    This is a big deal, and reflects the closing of a substantial gap. Women in the 1960’s were 7 times more likely to work in traditionally female occupations. Studies estimate that 15% to 20% of wage growth in the last 50 years was due to a decline in barriers to occupational choice.

    So we’ve made a lot of progress, but clearly there’s more work to be done to get more women into predominately male-dominated fields and more men into female-dominated fields. For example, less than 20% of graduates in computer science and engineering are women, down from 37% in 1985. Reducing barriers to female occupational choice, including gender discrimination, would not only raise women’s earnings, but would also increase overall productivity by better matching workers’ skills to jobs.

    whitehouse:

For her second chart today, White House economist Betsey Stevenson breaks down how women now make up the majority of college students. Follow along → I Love Charts.
ilovecharts:

Next up, let’s talk about college: Women now make up the majority of college and graduate students. Nice work!
Since the mid-1990s:
A greater share of young women have obtained four-year college degrees than men.
The share of young women enrolled in both undergraduate and graduate study has increased.
Most 18 to 34 year-old students are enrolled in undergraduate programs, and the percent enrolled in graduate school has gone way up.
Today, the share of young women enrolled in graduate school is more than 25% higher than the share of men. Learn more about how President Obama’s fighting to make college more affordable for women (and men).

    whitehouse:

    For her second chart today, White House economist Betsey Stevenson breaks down how women now make up the majority of college students. Follow along → I Love Charts.

    ilovecharts:

    Next up, let’s talk about college: Women now make up the majority of college and graduate students. Nice work!

    Since the mid-1990s:

    1. A greater share of young women have obtained four-year college degrees than men.
    2. The share of young women enrolled in both undergraduate and graduate study has increased.
    3. Most 18 to 34 year-old students are enrolled in undergraduate programs, and the percent enrolled in graduate school has gone way up.

    Today, the share of young women enrolled in graduate school is more than 25% higher than the share of men. Learn more about how President Obama’s fighting to make college more affordable for women (and men).

    whitehouse:

White House economist Betsey Stevenson is taking over I Love Charts today as the Chartist in Residence in honor of Women’s Equality Day. Be sure to wonk out with Betsey!
ilovecharts:

Hey everyone! Betsey Stevenson here from President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers. In honor of Women’s Equality Day, I’ll be taking over I Love Charts to tell the story of the progress we’ve made in closing the earnings gap between women and men, and the challenges women still face in the workforce. 
Let’s get started. Our first chart shows how women are increasingly contributing to family income and now make up about half the workforce. Since 2000, women’s labor force participation has dropped slightly, but most of that is because of cyclical factors and an aging population. While older women participate in the workforce at lower rates than younger women, the percent of older women who are working has increased since the mid-1990s, partially offsetting the overall decline.
At the other end of the spectrum, young women are more likely to be enrolled in school than they were a generation ago, and that’s good news. Since students (even ones who work part-time) are not considered to be in the labor force, increased school enrollment will depress the participation rate.
Wanna wonk out some more on this stuff? Check out our report on “Women’s Participation in Education and the Workforce.”

    whitehouse:

    White House economist Betsey Stevenson is taking over I Love Charts today as the Chartist in Residence in honor of Women’s Equality Day. Be sure to wonk out with Betsey!

    ilovecharts:

    Hey everyone! Betsey Stevenson here from President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers. In honor of Women’s Equality Day, I’ll be taking over I Love Charts to tell the story of the progress we’ve made in closing the earnings gap between women and men, and the challenges women still face in the workforce. 

    Let’s get started. Our first chart shows how women are increasingly contributing to family income and now make up about half the workforce. Since 2000, women’s labor force participation has dropped slightly, but most of that is because of cyclical factors and an aging population. While older women participate in the workforce at lower rates than younger women, the percent of older women who are working has increased since the mid-1990s, partially offsetting the overall decline.

    At the other end of the spectrum, young women are more likely to be enrolled in school than they were a generation ago, and that’s good news. Since students (even ones who work part-time) are not considered to be in the labor force, increased school enrollment will depress the participation rate.

    Wanna wonk out some more on this stuff? Check out our report on “Women’s Participation in Education and the Workforce.”