John's Tumblr

Sep 20

SPL’s new kicks. He tells me my shoes range from “not great” to “incredibly ugly.”

SPL’s new kicks. He tells me my shoes range from “not great” to “incredibly ugly.”

Sep 12

http://www.aol.it/11GZMuU -

We’re very lucky that Megan is serving at US CTO. Watch this; get excited. So good.

(Source: makers.com)

Sep 10

Microsoft & Minecraft

Sometimes 140 characters isn’t quite enough to have a nuanced back & forth.

A few minutes ago I tweeted that the more I think about it, the more I think that Microsoft buying Minecraft is an incredible, incredible (and surprising) move by Satya Nadella that is very very long range in thinking. 

I got some pushback in my Twitter stream that says Microsoft doesn’t need another game franchise, has a strong Xbox line, etc etc. 

But here’s the thing: Minecraft is less like Halo, and a lot more like Lego. It’s not a game, any more than Lego is just a toy. It’s cultural, and foundational. 

When I talk with just about any techie maker that I know today, then can remember back to when they first started playing around with how things work, with how to make their own new things. People in my generation can remember, vividly, when they started playing D&D and how they built those worlds. How they set up their little Lego guys in all sorts of scenarios. And what computer they typed (copied, generally) their first program into. The generation after mine remembers that, but built on the web & Netscape. The newest generation can tell you about their first mobile app building experience.

So here’s the thing: the next generation of makers — 5 or 10 years down the road — they’re all building worlds in Minecraft today. Just look around. Watch what the most interesting kids around are getting obsessed about. Take a look at what they’re building, and the levels of complexity they’re grappling with before they even really can grok what they’re making.

They’re next. 

And Microsoft buying Minecraft — and, hopefully, investing in Minecraft in a way that also lets it stay independent and vibrant — says, very clearly, that Microsoft wants to stand, again, with the makers. 

Lots of reasons to be skeptical, cynical, pessimistic, or whatever. And anyone who knows me or my background knows that I’ve been very skeptical of, if not combative with, Microsoft through most of my career.

But with this move, Microsoft is saying they are with the makers — the next generation — and that’s a smart, wondrous, and optimistic start to Satya’s leadership there, seems to me. 

Aug 30

[video]

[video]

First AYSO day for Z.

First AYSO day for Z.

Aug 27

whitehouse:

Betsey Stevenson just signed off as today’s Chartist in Residence for I Love Charts. Be sure to check out all of her posts on the gender pay gap and how we fix it. Thanks for following along!
ilovecharts:

Here’s the bottom line: We’re making progress, but the gender pay gap still exists at all income levels, and widens as people get older.
Highly-educated women with professional degrees tend to begin their careers at approximately the same salary level as their male counterparts, but as their careers progress, a gender gap opens up. By their late 30’s, men with professional degrees earn 50% more than their female counterparts.
So how do we fix that? Beginning with the first bill he signed into law, President Obama’s been fighting to help women receive the pay they deserve. But he can’t do it all by himself. Congress needs to act to help ensure equal pay for women.
That’s all for today! I hope you enjoyed our charts. I had a blast. —Betsey

whitehouse:

Betsey Stevenson just signed off as today’s Chartist in Residence for I Love Charts. Be sure to check out all of her posts on the gender pay gap and how we fix it. Thanks for following along!

ilovecharts:

Here’s the bottom line: We’re making progress, but the gender pay gap still exists at all income levels, and widens as people get older.

Highly-educated women with professional degrees tend to begin their careers at approximately the same salary level as their male counterparts, but as their careers progress, a gender gap opens up. By their late 30’s, men with professional degrees earn 50% more than their female counterparts.

So how do we fix that? Beginning with the first bill he signed into law, President Obama’s been fighting to help women receive the pay they deserve. But he can’t do it all by himself. Congress needs to act to help ensure equal pay for women.

That’s all for today! I hope you enjoyed our charts. I had a blast. —Betsey

whitehouse:

Did you think she was done for the day? Here’s Betsey Stevenson on America’s place among developed nations in female labor force participation, and how we can improve it.
ilovecharts:

Ok, so things are improving on many fronts when it comes to women in the workforce, but we’re slipping compared to other countries when it comes to female labor force participation.
Since 1990, the U.S. has dropped from 7th to 16th in that category among advanced democracies—that’s in the bottom third. In fact, we’re the only developed country that does not guarantee paid maternity leave.
But with the right policy changes, we can jump back up the leaderboard and help expand opportunity for millions of women. Paid leave and other policies that enable workers to better balance work and family obligations could help boost female labor force participation. One study estimated that U.S. female labor force participation would be 6.8 percentage points higher if the U.S. had implemented a suite of family-friendly policies. (cc Republicans in Congress)

whitehouse:

Did you think she was done for the day? Here’s Betsey Stevenson on America’s place among developed nations in female labor force participation, and how we can improve it.

ilovecharts:

Ok, so things are improving on many fronts when it comes to women in the workforce, but we’re slipping compared to other countries when it comes to female labor force participation.

Since 1990, the U.S. has dropped from 7th to 16th in that category among advanced democracies—that’s in the bottom third. In fact, we’re the only developed country that does not guarantee paid maternity leave.

But with the right policy changes, we can jump back up the leaderboard and help expand opportunity for millions of women. Paid leave and other policies that enable workers to better balance work and family obligations could help boost female labor force participation. One study estimated that U.S. female labor force participation would be 6.8 percentage points higher if the U.S. had implemented a suite of family-friendly policies. (cc Republicans in Congress)

[video]

staff:

ilovecharts:

Hey everyone! Betsey Stevenson here from President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers. In honor of Women’s Equality Day, I’ll be taking over I Love Charts to tell the story of the progress we’ve made in closing the earnings gap between women and men, and the challenges women still face in the workforce. 

Betsey says it better than we can. Have a look at the results. 
Also, hey, Happy Women’s Equality Day, Tumblr. 

staff:

ilovecharts:

Hey everyone! Betsey Stevenson here from President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers. In honor of Women’s Equality Day, I’ll be taking over I Love Charts to tell the story of the progress we’ve made in closing the earnings gap between women and men, and the challenges women still face in the workforce. 

Betsey says it better than we can. Have a look at the results

Also, hey, Happy Women’s Equality Day, Tumblr. 

whitehouse:

Betsey Stevenson’s takeover of I Love Charts continues: Check out how women are cracking the glass ceiling in fields traditionally dominated by men.
ilovecharts:

Women have been doing some serious glass-ceiling cracking since the 1960’s. Young women are increasingly working in fields traditionally dominated by men.
Today, female college graduates ages 30 to 34 are just as likely to be employed as doctors, dentists, lawyers, professors, managers and scientists as they are to be employed as teachers, nurses, librarians, secretaries or social workers.
This is a big deal, and reflects the closing of a substantial gap. Women in the 1960’s were 7 times more likely to work in traditionally female occupations. Studies estimate that 15% to 20% of wage growth in the last 50 years was due to a decline in barriers to occupational choice.
So we’ve made a lot of progress, but clearly there’s more work to be done to get more women into predominately male-dominated fields and more men into female-dominated fields. For example, less than 20% of graduates in computer science and engineering are women, down from 37% in 1985. Reducing barriers to female occupational choice, including gender discrimination, would not only raise women’s earnings, but would also increase overall productivity by better matching workers’ skills to jobs.

whitehouse:

Betsey Stevenson’s takeover of I Love Charts continues: Check out how women are cracking the glass ceiling in fields traditionally dominated by men.

ilovecharts:

Women have been doing some serious glass-ceiling cracking since the 1960’s. Young women are increasingly working in fields traditionally dominated by men.

Today, female college graduates ages 30 to 34 are just as likely to be employed as doctors, dentists, lawyers, professors, managers and scientists as they are to be employed as teachers, nurses, librarians, secretaries or social workers.

This is a big deal, and reflects the closing of a substantial gap. Women in the 1960’s were 7 times more likely to work in traditionally female occupations. Studies estimate that 15% to 20% of wage growth in the last 50 years was due to a decline in barriers to occupational choice.

So we’ve made a lot of progress, but clearly there’s more work to be done to get more women into predominately male-dominated fields and more men into female-dominated fields. For example, less than 20% of graduates in computer science and engineering are women, down from 37% in 1985. Reducing barriers to female occupational choice, including gender discrimination, would not only raise women’s earnings, but would also increase overall productivity by better matching workers’ skills to jobs.

whitehouse:

For her second chart today, White House economist Betsey Stevenson breaks down how women now make up the majority of college students. Follow along → I Love Charts.
ilovecharts:

Next up, let’s talk about college: Women now make up the majority of college and graduate students. Nice work!
Since the mid-1990s:
A greater share of young women have obtained four-year college degrees than men.
The share of young women enrolled in both undergraduate and graduate study has increased.
Most 18 to 34 year-old students are enrolled in undergraduate programs, and the percent enrolled in graduate school has gone way up.
Today, the share of young women enrolled in graduate school is more than 25% higher than the share of men. Learn more about how President Obama’s fighting to make college more affordable for women (and men).

whitehouse:

For her second chart today, White House economist Betsey Stevenson breaks down how women now make up the majority of college students. Follow along → I Love Charts.

ilovecharts:

Next up, let’s talk about college: Women now make up the majority of college and graduate students. Nice work!

Since the mid-1990s:

  1. A greater share of young women have obtained four-year college degrees than men.
  2. The share of young women enrolled in both undergraduate and graduate study has increased.
  3. Most 18 to 34 year-old students are enrolled in undergraduate programs, and the percent enrolled in graduate school has gone way up.

Today, the share of young women enrolled in graduate school is more than 25% higher than the share of men. Learn more about how President Obama’s fighting to make college more affordable for women (and men).

whitehouse:

White House economist Betsey Stevenson is taking over I Love Charts today as the Chartist in Residence in honor of Women’s Equality Day. Be sure to wonk out with Betsey!
ilovecharts:

Hey everyone! Betsey Stevenson here from President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers. In honor of Women’s Equality Day, I’ll be taking over I Love Charts to tell the story of the progress we’ve made in closing the earnings gap between women and men, and the challenges women still face in the workforce. 
Let’s get started. Our first chart shows how women are increasingly contributing to family income and now make up about half the workforce. Since 2000, women’s labor force participation has dropped slightly, but most of that is because of cyclical factors and an aging population. While older women participate in the workforce at lower rates than younger women, the percent of older women who are working has increased since the mid-1990s, partially offsetting the overall decline.
At the other end of the spectrum, young women are more likely to be enrolled in school than they were a generation ago, and that’s good news. Since students (even ones who work part-time) are not considered to be in the labor force, increased school enrollment will depress the participation rate.
Wanna wonk out some more on this stuff? Check out our report on “Women’s Participation in Education and the Workforce.”

whitehouse:

White House economist Betsey Stevenson is taking over I Love Charts today as the Chartist in Residence in honor of Women’s Equality Day. Be sure to wonk out with Betsey!

ilovecharts:

Hey everyone! Betsey Stevenson here from President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers. In honor of Women’s Equality Day, I’ll be taking over I Love Charts to tell the story of the progress we’ve made in closing the earnings gap between women and men, and the challenges women still face in the workforce. 

Let’s get started. Our first chart shows how women are increasingly contributing to family income and now make up about half the workforce. Since 2000, women’s labor force participation has dropped slightly, but most of that is because of cyclical factors and an aging population. While older women participate in the workforce at lower rates than younger women, the percent of older women who are working has increased since the mid-1990s, partially offsetting the overall decline.

At the other end of the spectrum, young women are more likely to be enrolled in school than they were a generation ago, and that’s good news. Since students (even ones who work part-time) are not considered to be in the labor force, increased school enrollment will depress the participation rate.

Wanna wonk out some more on this stuff? Check out our report on “Women’s Participation in Education and the Workforce.”

Aug 25

In business, let's stop using the language of war -

roybahat:

“The opposite of war isn’t peace, it’s creation.” —Jonathan Larson

We compare business to war so often, we hardly notice. “Battlefield promotion.” “Let’s go on a retreat.” “More wood behind fewer arrows.” “Captains of industry.” “Alliances.” Even the origin of the word “company” is…

Aug 19

This Should Only Take a Minute or Four, Probably — Medium -

bijan:

Love this.