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I'm a partner at Greylock, former CEO of Mozilla, founder of Reactivity, dad, husband & nerd, among other things.

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    I’ve been wearing the new Nike Fuelband for a week or so, and so far I like it pretty well. If you read my blog at all you know I’m a little obsessed with all these types of things and am optimistic that they can meaningfully change consumer behavior as they’re more widely adopted.
Most obvious comparisons here are to Fitbit and Jawbone’s Up. For some reason, the Fitbit never caught with me — I just never remembered to carry it with me. The bracelet form of the Up & Fuelband work a lot better for me, and have the additional benefit that they’re visible to me, helping me be a little more mindful of my fitness.
Compared to the Up, I miss the sleep tracking and (especially) the vibrating alarm, which I used a LOT on my Up. I also liked the extremely long battery life of the Up.
The Fuelband, by contrast, has half the battery life, no sleep tracking or alarm, and I don’t think it’s waterproof enough to wear in the shower.
On the other hand, the software is (marginally) better.
But the display iswonderful.I love looking at the multicolored LED display on the Fuelband, and being able to track progress through the day does (so far) seem to actually change my behavior — if I find myself coming in light on a certain day I tend to find activities to hit my goal. So I think it’s obvious (to me at least) that an ever present display is pretty important for behavior change.
(for now I’m not going to go into the Fuel points thing — a little quirky, but okay - or the fact that the Fuelband doesn’t seem to talk to other Nike sensors yet. for a later post)
Anyway, I’m finding that this recent group of sensors is getting better than ever. That’s step 1. Now we also need data aggregation & insights, and apps that actually help you change behavior. Then we’ll be cooking.

    I’ve been wearing the new Nike Fuelband for a week or so, and so far I like it pretty well. If you read my blog at all you know I’m a little obsessed with all these types of things and am optimistic that they can meaningfully change consumer behavior as they’re more widely adopted.

    Most obvious comparisons here are to Fitbit and Jawbone’s Up. For some reason, the Fitbit never caught with me — I just never remembered to carry it with me. The bracelet form of the Up & Fuelband work a lot better for me, and have the additional benefit that they’re visible to me, helping me be a little more mindful of my fitness.

    Compared to the Up, I miss the sleep tracking and (especially) the vibrating alarm, which I used a LOT on my Up. I also liked the extremely long battery life of the Up.

    The Fuelband, by contrast, has half the battery life, no sleep tracking or alarm, and I don’t think it’s waterproof enough to wear in the shower.

    On the other hand, the software is (marginally) better.

    But the display iswonderful.I love looking at the multicolored LED display on the Fuelband, and being able to track progress through the day does (so far) seem to actually change my behavior — if I find myself coming in light on a certain day I tend to find activities to hit my goal. So I think it’s obvious (to me at least) that an ever present display is pretty important for behavior change.

    (for now I’m not going to go into the Fuel points thing — a little quirky, but okay - or the fact that the Fuelband doesn’t seem to talk to other Nike sensors yet. for a later post)

    Anyway, I’m finding that this recent group of sensors is getting better than ever. That’s step 1. Now we also need data aggregation & insights, and apps that actually help you change behavior. Then we’ll be cooking.

    8 notes
    1. hyv reblogged this from lilly and added:
      Me- I have not seen any comparisons of them so this is great. (biased toward Nike anyway -retail partner- but..)
    2. lilly posted this